Monopoly, WWII game

HOMEFRONT PRISONERS OF WAR THOMAS K. OLIVER (USAAF)      Tom Oliver in 2009      Oliver photos 2012 PETER DAHLBERG (ARMY)      December 7, 1941      Friends for Life      He Took My Place       Christmas Lights HAROLD TAYLOR (USAAF)      Story of Had Taylor STAN LIEBERMAN (ARMY)     Story of Stan Lieberman LESTER SNYDER (USAAF)       Durkee's Crew WARREN FAGERLAND (ARMY) EJI SUYAMA (ARMY)      My Combat in the 442nd HARRY NOLLSCH (ARMY)        Harry Nollsch       Taps Delayed       The Purple Heart FRANK MORAWA (GERM. ARMY)        Life of Frank Morawa LOYD BRANDT (MARINES)      Reluctant Heroes       Brothers in Arms JERRY TEACHOUT (USAAF)       Leaving Home for WWII CHUCK CHILDS (USAAF)       I Flew the Big One      Combat Mission 15      Riding Rails before WW2 HARRY PUTNAM (NAVY)       Veterans STEVEN WARREN (NAVY) GORDON LEASE (COAST GUARD) CLARENCE CARSNER (ARMY) WALLY DAHLQUIST (USAAF) GEORGE W. LARSON (NAVY) ALAN HERBERT (ARMY) RICHARD PERKINS (MARINES)      Letter home, 1944 RUSSEL FRINK (NAVY) JIM LOCKHART (NAVY) REX ALAN SMITH (ARMY ENG) VINCE FITZGERALD (NAVY) HONOR FLIGHTS CHARLES ANDERSON (USAAF)      Life of Charles Anderson HARLAND HERMANN (ARMY)      Letters during WWII WALTER MARCHAND (ARMY)      D-Day Doctor's Diary JUNO SUNDSTROM (ARMY) KEITH CHRISTENSEN (ARMY)      John Fuller Goes to War HAROLD JANSEN (Navy) JOHN W. FULLER (NAVY) DEAN SHAFFHAUSEN (NAVY) CHARLES GERLACH (NAVY) WAYNE BREWSTER (ARMY) WILLIAM A. SEMLEK (ARMY) KENNETH HALLIGAN (ARMY) WALTER MEHLHAFF (ARMY) EDDIE KODET (ARMY) TOM McDILL (ARMY) PAUL PRIEST (ARMY) VICTOR WEIDENSEE (ARMY)       Weidensee maps OLA CAMPBELL (USAAF) DALLAS BLOMQUIST (Marines) BILL LOFGREN (ARMY) JOHN WILKINSON (ROYAL AF) MARCELLA LeBEAU (ARMY) HILARY COLE (USAAF) TOM WENN (USAAF) JOHN GASTON (USAAF) MAURICE CROW (USAAF) GEORGE MOLSTAD (USAAF) GEORGE MOE (US ARMY)

     Starting  in 1941, an increasing number  of British Airmen found themselves as the involuntary guests  of the Third Reich, and  the Crown was casting about for ways  and means to facilitate  their escape...
    Now  obviously, one of the  most helpful aids to that end is a useful and accurate  map, one showing  
not  only where stuff was, but also  showing the locations of 'safe houses' where a POW on-the-lam  could go for food and  shelter.
  
   Paper  maps had some real drawbacks: they make a lot of noise when  you open and fold them, they  wear out rapidly, and if they get  wet, they turn into   mush.
   Someone  in MI-5 (similar to America 's  OSS ) got the idea of printing  escape maps on silk. It's  durable, can be scrunched-up into tiny wads, and unfolded as  many times as needed, and makes no noise  whatsoever.  
   At  that time, there was only one  manufacturer in Great Britain that had perfected the  technology of printing on silk, and  that was John Waddington,  Ltd. When approached by the  government, the firm was only too  happy to do its bit for the  war effort.
  
   By  pure coincidence, Waddington was also  the U.K. Licensee for the popular American board game,  Monopoly. As it happened, 'games and pastimes' was a category  of item qualified for  insertion into 'CARE packages',  dispatched by the  International Red Cross to prisoners of   war.
  
   Under  the strictest of secrecy, in a  securely guarded and inaccessible old workshop on the grounds  of Waddington's, a  group of sworn-to-secrecy employees began  mass-producing  escape maps, keyed to each region of Germany or  Italy where  Allied POW camps were regional system). When  processed, these  maps could be folded into such tiny dots that  they would  actually fit inside a Monopoly playing   piece.
  
   As  long as they were at it, the clever  workmen at Waddington's also managed to add:
     1. A playing  token, containing a small  magnetic compass
     2. A two-part  metal file that could easily  be screwed together
     3. Useful  amounts of genuine  high-denomination German, Italian, and  French currency, hidden within the piles of Monopoly money!
  
   British  and American air crews were  advised, before taking off on  their first mission, how to  identify a 'rigged' Monopoly set--by means of a tiny red  dot, one cleverly rigged to look  like an ordinary printing  glitch, located in the corner of the  Free Parking  square.
  
   Of  the estimated 35,000 Allied POWS who  successfully escaped, an  estimated one-third were aided in  their flight by the rigged Monopoly sets.. Everyone who did so  was sworn to secrecy indefinitely, since the British  Government might want to use  this highly successful ruse in  still another, future war.  
    The  story wasn't  declassified until 2007, when the surviving craftsmen from  Waddington's, as well as the firm itself, were finally honored  in a public  ceremony.  It's  always nice when you can play that  'Get Out of Jail' Free' card!