Thomas Wolfe's advice

HOMEFRONT PRISONERS OF WAR THOMAS K. OLIVER (USAAF)      Tom Oliver in 2009      Oliver photos 2012 PETER DAHLBERG (ARMY)      December 7, 1941      Friends for Life      He Took My Place       Christmas Lights HAROLD TAYLOR (USAAF)      Story of Had Taylor STAN LIEBERMAN (ARMY)     Story of Stan Lieberman LESTER SNYDER (USAAF)       Durkee's Crew WARREN FAGERLAND (ARMY) EJI SUYAMA (ARMY)      My Combat in the 442nd HARRY NOLLSCH (ARMY)        Harry Nollsch       Taps Delayed       The Purple Heart FRANK MORAWA (GERM. ARMY)        Life of Frank Morawa LOYD BRANDT (MARINES)      Reluctant Heroes       Brothers in Arms JERRY TEACHOUT (USAAF)       Leaving Home for WWII CHUCK CHILDS (USAAF)       I Flew the Big One      Combat Mission 15      Riding Rails before WW2 HARRY PUTNAM (NAVY)       Veterans STEVEN WARREN (NAVY) GORDON LEASE (COAST GUARD) CLARENCE CARSNER (ARMY) WALLY DAHLQUIST (USAAF) GEORGE W. LARSON (NAVY) ALAN HERBERT (ARMY) RICHARD PERKINS (MARINES)      Letter home, 1944 RUSSEL FRINK (NAVY) JIM LOCKHART (NAVY) REX ALAN SMITH (ARMY ENG) VINCE FITZGERALD (NAVY) HONOR FLIGHTS CHARLES ANDERSON (USAAF)      Life of Charles Anderson HARLAND HERMANN (ARMY)      Letters during WWII WALTER MARCHAND (ARMY)      D-Day Doctor's Diary JUNO SUNDSTROM (ARMY) KEITH CHRISTENSEN (ARMY) DEAN SHAFFHAUSEN (NAVY) CHARLES GERLACH (NAVY) WAYNE BREWSTER (ARMY) WILLIAM A. SEMLEK (ARMY) KENNETH HALLIGAN (ARMY) WALTER MEHLHAFF (ARMY) EDDIE KODET (ARMY) TOM McDILL (ARMY) PAUL PRIEST (ARMY) VICTOR WEIDENSEE (ARMY)       Weidensee maps OLA CAMPBELL (USAAF) DALLAS BLOMQUIST (Marines) BILL LOFGREN (ARMY) HAROLD JANSEN (Navy)       Personal Summary JOHN W. FULLER (NAVY)      John Fuller Goes to War JOHN WILKINSON (ROYAL AF) MARCELLA LeBEAU (ARMY) HILARY COLE (USAAF) TOM WENN (USAAF) JOHN GASTON (USAAF) MAURICE CROW (USAAF) GEORGE MOLSTAD (USAAF) GEORGE MOE (US ARMY) MEL CARLSON (NAVY)

This is [may be] a first book, and in it the author has written of

experience which is now far and lost, but which was once part of

the fabric of his life.  If any reader, therefore, should say that

the book is "autobiographical" the writer has no answer for him: it

seems to him that all serious work in fiction is autobiographical--

that, for instance, a more autobiographical work than "Gulliver's

Travels" cannot easily be imagined.

 

This note, however, is addressed principally to those persons whom

the writer may have known in the period covered by these pages.

To these persons, he would say what he believes they understand

already: that this book was written in innocence and nakedness of

spirit, and that the writer's main concern was to give fulness,

life, and intensity to the actions and people in the book he was

creating.  Now that it is to be published, he would insist that

this book is a fiction, and that he meditated no man's portrait

here.

 

But we are the sum of all the moments of our lives--all that is

ours is in them: we cannot escape or conceal it.  If the writer has

used the clay of life to make his book, he has only used what all

men must, what none can keep from using.  Fiction is not fact, but

fiction is fact selected and understood, fiction is fact arranged

and charged with purpose.  Dr. Johnson remarked that a man would

turn over half a library to make a single book: in the same way, a

novelist may turn over half the people in a town to make a single

figure in his novel.  This is not the whole method but the writer

believes it illustrates the whole method in a book that is written

from a middle distance and is without rancour or bitter intention.